A poem traveling through the dark

However, the first word of the next line, "dead," immediately reverses this impression, more so by its delay. In a different context, Stafford has recalled the origin of the poem in a personal episode: All of these describe the anxiety he feels about his responsibility.

This is an ethical dilemma - open up the doe to bring a new fawn into the world, risk being hit by other cars. The reader understands from the first stanza.

Traveling Through the Dark: William Stafford - Summary and Critical Analysis

He pushes the deer and her unborn fawn over the edge into the river. Is the driver hesitating because he's thinking about a rescue?

This metaphysical bridge will have to be quite long, and he wishes to underline this point by making the thread that the spider will use to launch itself into the air drawn out to an extreme. The rules of the pattern leave Stafford enough flexibility to sound conversational, yet the poem manages, while sounding conversational, to remind us of poetry, one reason being that the accentual prosody as deployed here by Stafford contains so many buried echoes of traditional prosody.

There is also personification in the final quatrain when the car aims its parking lights. I don't think it's fair to dump on the emotional self as commodity. William Stafford - Summary and Critical Analysis In this poem Traveling Through the Dark the poet William Stafford describes how he was moved by the death of a pregnant doe when he was driving a car along the mountain road at night.

He sees the victim "By glow of the tail-light. The reader has known from the beginning that this is what the traveler will do to save more lives, but this knowledge cannot eliminate a feeling of helplessness, nor a sense of waste. From Kansas Quarterly Finally, darkness points to the final destiny of all beings, the darkness of death.

William Stafford - Summary and Critical Analysis In this poem Traveling Through the Dark the poet William Stafford describes how he was moved by the death of a pregnant doe when he was driving a car along the mountain road at night.

If so, one reason is that it transcends the difficulties he had with the earlier Far West poems. She was a doe and she had recently been killed. Stafford, thankfully, avoids the maudlin trap of this topic by presenting the poem's events objectively with an almost reporter-like, semi-detached eye."If you have been wondering where the articulate, readable poems have gone in the last third of the 20th century, you might start with [William] Stafford," declares Victor Howes of the Christian Science Monitor.A pacifist and one of "the quiet of the land," as.

Traveling through the dark I found a deer dead on the edge of the Wilson River road. It is usually best to roll them into the canyon: that road is narrow; to swerve might make more dead. William Stafford’s “Traveling Through the Dark” is a short poem of eighteen lines, divided into four quatrains and a closing couplet.

The title clearly describes both the literal and the. The first poem, “Traveling Through the Dark” by William Stafford, would be considered the starting point of idea of the two different poems. That means that this poem was written first and the other one was written in respond to the first one.

Traveling through the Dark by William Stafford. Home / Poetry / Traveling through the Dark / Analysis / Here again, just like with the dark and the road, in the primary reading of the poem the car is just a car.

Stafford is not trying to fool anyone. But in the way the.

Traveling Through The Dark - Poem by William Stafford

Traveling through the dark I found a deer dead on the edge of the Wilson River road. It is usually best to roll them into the canyon: that road is narrow; to swerve might make more dead.

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A poem traveling through the dark
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